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  1. Aaron

    Aaron Leader

    What is the general impression of them? Any stateside?
  2. turbofiat124

    turbofiat124 Premium Member Forum Donor

    I got a 1980 Fiat 131. Which is basically the same car as a Fiat 125 Polski.
  3. Aaron

    Aaron Leader

    Is it a two stroke? Parts hard to come by?
  4. bigmark40

    bigmark40 Puttering Along

    They're 4 stroke, based on the old Fiat 125 that were built under license by FSO. They had a variety of engines from 1.3, 1.5, 1.8 and 2.0, but the 1.3 and 1.5 were the most common.
    They were spacious and comfortable and pretty reliable mechanically, but were built with low grade steel and most suffered badly from rust.
    They're quite similar to the Lada 1300/1500 and Lada Riva, but my own feeling is that they were more reliable than Lada's. There's still quite a few available to buy in Poland, but pretty scarce elsewhere. Likewise parts availability only through Poland.
    Hope this helps.

    Mark
  5. turbofiat124

    turbofiat124 Premium Member Forum Donor

    If I recall, they used the old SOHC pushrod type engine but a lot of people have installed twin cam engines like what is used in my Spider and Brava.

    You should be able to source most mechanical and electrical parts you need here in the United States. Most of which interchange with other Fiats from that era. 90%+ of the parts used on my Yugo will interchange with some other Fiat. There may be some "unique" parts you'll have to source from aboard since 125s were not sold here.

    There's more Fiat part distributors here in the US than Trabbi part suppliers in Germany.

    Also I've found whatever a part costs for a Fiat, the same part for a Trabant+ shipping is about double or three times that.

    Never could figure out why Trabant brake drums are so damn expensive! Yet a Fiat brake rotor is just $20! Not even worth turning.
    But a rear taillight for a 2000 Spider is about $350 where a Trabant lense is less than $20. Go figure.
  6. bigmark40

    bigmark40 Puttering Along

    They were available in Northern Ireland, where I'm from, but I haven't seen any in many years. Occasionally one pops up on UK ebay. They didn't sell in big numbers here despite being RHD and just about the cheapest new car on the market.
    www.otomoto.pl usually has a few in Poland for sale.
  7. turbofiat124

    turbofiat124 Premium Member Forum Donor

    Seems to still be a lot of 125s on the roads down in Australia and New Zealand. I'm on an Australian Fiat site called turbo124.com and there are several guys on there with 125s.
  8. 2StrokeRich

    2StrokeRich Newbie

    I have an FSM Fiat 126. Beauty! (Or it will be when it is finished - 11 year restoration so far...) (First car when I passed my test! For most that car is a distant memory!) Known in Poland as a Maluch.
  9. turbofiat124

    turbofiat124 Premium Member Forum Donor

    My Trabbi (the one on stilts) was shipped over with a Fiat 126. The imported called it a Polski. When he sent me photos, I was like, "I always thought a Polski was a Fiat 125". I was tempted to buy it since I'm into Fiats but have too many cars as it is. I just recently sold my Fiat 131 to my stepson who needed transportation.

    Did FSM rebody the Fiat 125 and call it something else? it was a four door hatchback/station wagon type vehicle. Sort of like Zastava rebodied the Fiat 127 and called it a Yugo?

    [​IMG]
  10. Matteo

    Matteo Premium Member Forum Donor

    Parts for old FIAT are dead easy and cheap to source out. At least here in Italy ;)
    Justin likes this.
  11. turbofiat124

    turbofiat124 Premium Member Forum Donor

    Actually there are quite a several Fiat part vendors here in the United States. One thing I like about owning a Fiat is I can place an order and it's usually at my house in a couple of days.

    Most of the Fiats that are still on the roads are the 124 Spider and X 1/9. Just guessing but I believe there are less than 100 Fiat 131s still on the roads here in the US. After an almost 30 year absense from the US market, Fiat has returned with the 500 and 500L models. They seem to be selling quite well. Hopefully they will introduce more models eventually.

    One problem we have ran into is getting "good" parts. Usually anything made of rubber. Seems some of these vendors are getting there parts from unknown sources, maybe Russia and Turkey for example. For awhile people were having ball joints break after 1500 km! Or control arm bushings failing prematurely. Or those rubber driveshaft couplers. When one of those things let's go, it usually takes out the transmission with it!
  12. Matteo

    Matteo Premium Member Forum Donor

    In Italy you can choose to buy cheap and somewhat low quality Fiat parts, or "good" ( :) ) OE parts. You get what you pay for ;)
  13. rpiereck

    rpiereck Puttering Along

    There is a Polish guy who lives in North Carolina that has a 126P, he's got some videos of the car on YouTube.
  14. Caleb

    Caleb Loyal Comrade

  15. turbofiat124

    turbofiat124 Premium Member Forum Donor

    I thought that might have been the same 126 that was shipped over with my Trabant but it has chrome bumpers where this one has black ones.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  16. Austinpowers

    Austinpowers Loyal Comrade

    I had a Fiat 126 for a while,I rescued it from being scrapped. Good fun to drive around town as they handle like a go kart. And to be honest they aren't much bigger. You can still see a lot of the polish built ones in Hungary in daily use. Over here in the UK they are becoming quite expensive as they are now considered a classic. The one to go for is the air cooled version. The latter liquid cooled engines suffered from over heating problems. Even when correctly serviced regularly.
  17. DaveinOz

    DaveinOz Aussie Trabant Nutter Forum Donor

    These are (or were) fairly common in Australia, they were sold new here from 1989-1993 as the FSM 'Niki' - a friend at school had one. I remember riding in the back seat and it was incredibly cramped - and this is coming from a classic Mini owner! They were the cheapest new car on the Australian market - the next cheapest car, a Daihatsu Mira was nearly double the price and the cheapest corolla cost nearly four times as much!!!!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    You still see them every now and then - even a few up for sale right now including a convertible!
    http://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/warr...fsm-niki-rare-collectible-mini-car/1078828519
    http://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/miranda/cars-vans-utes/1991-fiat-650-niki/1073538761
    http://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/thom...iat-fsm-niki-1990-650-convertible-/1041100485

    They are becoming scarce, but in Australia these are definitely more common than a Trabant!
  18. Andrew

    Andrew Most Powerful Leader Moderator Forum Donor

    Dam... 4500 for a fsm (though it looks in fine shape in the photos)... thats like double its original price :p
  19. turbofiat124

    turbofiat124 Premium Member Forum Donor

    Did you guys have anything to do with the Fiat Freakout that was held in Chicago from last year? I belonged to this club for ages but haven't been in about 5 years.

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